Roundup: 50 active COVID cases, ex-RCMP superintendent jailed for child porn, Pictou rider recounts Olympic experience, new single from Antigonish singer

Brittany Fraser-Beaulieu

Nova Scotia has 50 known active COVID-19 cases, with one new case and one recovery reported in the latest government update. Health officials say they continue to investigate the new case, which is in the Central Zone.

Since the pandemic began, the disease has killed 26,864 people across Canada, including 94 Nova Scotians.

As of Aug. 26, 76.7% of Nova Scotians have had one dose of COVID vaccine, and 69.5% have had both shots. Canadawide, 72.8% of people have had the first shot, and 65.8% are fully dosed.

Retired cop sentenced for child porn
A provincial court judge recently sentenced a retired RCMP superintendent to six months in jail and two years of probation.

Lauren McKiel, 84, of Mount Pleasant in Queens County, also had to submit a DNA sample to the national databank and register as a sex offender for 10 years.

Court documents reveal that a child exploitation investigation started when police learned that Microsoft reported a OneDrive user uploaded two files of suspected child pornography, featuring girls who were between nine and 12 years old.

McKiel’s lawyers say he regrets his actions and unsuccessfully sought a 90-day suspended sentence.

Keith Corcoran reports for LighthouseNow.

Pictou County equestrian reflects on Olympics
Brittany Fraser-Beaulieu returns from the recent Summer Olympics in Japan with lots of good memories, and momentum to move her equestrian career forward as she looks ahead to the 2024 Games in Paris.

The Pictou County-born member of Canada’s Olympic equestrian team rode her dressage mount All In to the finals during the competition. “It was definitely an incredible experience,” she says. “My performance was everything I hoped for. My score at the Olympics was not my personal best, but feeling from the test (competition) was the best feeling I’ve ever had.”

Steve Goodwin interviews her for The Pictou Advocate.

Charles Best and Frederick Banting

The miracle of insulin
As we see the worldwide success of the COVID-19 vaccine, many people don’t realize this month marks the centenary of another medical triumph, and a made-in-Canada one: the discovery of insulin.

For their discovery, Canadian researchers Frederick Banting and John Macleod the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1923. (But historians note that Charles Best also played a huge role in its discovery.)

Before their work, a diabetes diagnosis was a death sentence, and the best medical science could do was stave off the inevitable, with a near starvation-level diet.

In her latest Halifax Magazine column, Dorothy Grant looks back at their remarkable achievement.

New single for Antigonish singer
East Antigonish Education Centre teacher Buffy Boutilier recently released a new song called “Somebody Pray,” her response to the ongoing revelations about the horrors of the Canadian residential-school system.

The lyrics “came pouring out as I reflected on the many people in my life who have been affected personally,” she says, adding that she drew inspiration from the late Isabelle Knockwood, who wrote a book about her experience at the Shubenacdie Indian Residential School. “Before she passed, she had asked me, ‘Don’t forget the stories that I’m telling you’ … So it always stuck in my mind that eventually I want to write a piece of music about it.”

Jake Boudrot has more for The Reporter.

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This story was originally published in Halifax Magazine.

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